Have you woken up in mornings to your child saying sorry for wetting their bed and pyjamas? You and your child should be comforted that help is available and the good news is they may grow out of it.

What is Nocturnal Enuresis?
Nocturnal enuresis is the involuntary urination while asleep, also known as bedwetting. Enuresis is the loss of bladder control in younger children and teenagers. At age 3, night-time bedwetting is considered normal. The majority of children gain control of their bladder fully . If your child does experience bed wetting regularly from ages 5 to 7 years we recommend you seek professional advice and see your Doctor.

Statistics on enuresis
• In Australia one in five children wet their beds.
• Boys are more likely to experience bladder weakness more than girls (60% compared to 40%)
• Children who wet the bed can experience feelings of embarrassment that can lead to low self-esteem.

First Steps
Seek out advice on enuresis in children, what are the causes, symptoms and treatments. You can find out more on enuresis, causes and treatments from this article.

Struggles of Children with Enuresis
Children who experience bladder weakness may feel loss of self–esteem, embarrassment and even denial. The child may withdraw themselves and have less interaction with parents or peers.

What Causes Enuresis?
There are many factors which include: over active or under active bladder, feeling anxious, stress, urinary infections and family history. It is important to note that enuresis is treatable.

How Can You Help Your Child?
As a parent, we recommend you talk to your child so that they understand that they can learn bladder control and motivate them to do so until they recover.

Steps To Help Your Child
• Reinforce toileting during the day and before bed time
• Use a bed wetting reward chart – refer to iD Comfy Junior The Parents Guide
• Buy and make healthy foods
• Limit dairy, sweet and salty foods especially around dinner time

To Help Manage Bed Wetting Accidents Use iD Comfy Junior and Kylie For Kids Washable Mattress Protection
Bladder training can take two to three months to be successful. We recommend during this period, to use iD Comfy Junior pants and new Kylie for Kids Washable Mattress Protection to help set up your child for success. iD Comfy Junior range of pants and slips covers different age groups. The pants have a soft side panel, elastic underwear feel and a urine absorbing zone, with a stripy colour design. The slip is a great solution covering waist sizes from 40cm to 70cm.

To order your free sample go to https://www.ontexhealthcare.com.au/request-a-sample/.

New to the Kylie range is Kylie Kids Supreme Mac - washable mattress protection. Kylie For Kids Supreme Mac is super absorbent with four layers of protection. Designed for kids Kylie Supreme Mac has a water proof backing, is soft, latex free, dermatologically tested and includes odour control technology. Your kids will love the dinosaur fun design and you will feel secure knowing you have the best waterproof bedding protection for your child.  Kylie for Kids is available through BrightSky and Independence Australia.

Buy Kylie Kids Online through BrightSky

Buy Kylie Kids Online through Independence Australia

What is Nocturnal Enuresis (Bedwetting)
https://www.urologyhealth.org/urologic-conditions/nocturnal-enuresis-(bedwetting)
One in Five Kids wet their beds
https://www.continence.org.au/news.php/413/taking-the-stress-out-of-sleeepovers
iii) Bedwetting Facts
Bedwetting Facts
iv) Bladder Training
https://www.webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/bladder-training-techniques#1

Sleeping well is important for our health, both physical and mental. An adequate rest during the night sometimes is not as simple as it seems, especially when we begin to suffer urine losses. According to Dr. Eduard Estivill, Director of the Sleep Alterations Unit of the Institut Dexeus, "the consequences of poor sleep and rest reduce the alertness of the patient and daily activities, which increases the risk of domestic accidents, labor and traffic, and also the susceptibility to certain diseases such as depression.” “In short," - emphasizes the expert - "significantly reduces the quality of life of the patient and the relatives.”

Adults can suffer from nocturnal incontinence, that is, moderate to severe urine losses involuntarily, consciously or unconsciously while we sleep, or suffer from "nocturia" or nocturnal polyuria, that is, the necessity to go to the bathroom frequently during the night to urinate, between three and six times. Frequent urination can be caused by several factors, including certain diseases or some medications, although it can also influence the fact of having an overactive bladder, or other factors such as sleep apnea, anxiety or depression. All this causes changes in sleep patterns, tired feeling when waking and even weakening of the immune system.

By trying to avoid it, we can follow a series of very simple recommendations:

Keep a daily routine: getting up and going to bed at the same time each day is essential to get a good night's rest. Sleep cycles are linked to our daily activity, and respecting them helps you get to sleep every night. In addition, a relaxing bath, gentle stretching, reading or listening to music can help you fall asleep more easily.

Take care of your biorhythms and get up with daily light: natural light is necessary to regulate biorhythms and the sleep cycle. A part of the spectrum of natural light, known as blue light, is important for our ability to maintain healthy biological rhythms. When the brain receives less blue light, it produces less melanin, a substance that regulates the cycles of wakefulness and sleep.

Do some exercise: doing it for 20 or 30 minutes a day improves the quality of sleep. The most advisable thing is to practice exercise in the morning to activate the body, give it energy to perform during the day and when the night comes you will sleep better.

Avoid going to bed hungry: it is important to dine before going to sleep to avoid that the desire to eat wake us up in the middle of the night. But as important as this is not to dine copiously, because a heavy digestion can keep us awake much of the night. Also avoid spicy foods and follow a healthy diet.

Concentrate on sleep: thinking about the problems that have arisen during the day will only avoid you from falling asleep. Also avoid having a clock visible on the nightstand, as constantly watching it will only increase the discomfort.

The nap: this can be very restorative and help the daily performance, but try to sleep more than 30 minutes or doing so after 5 pm can damage the biological rhythm causing insomnia, less ability to concentrate during the day and can even reduce your reflexes.

Watch what you drink: the fact of drinking little will not prevent losses during the night, on the contrary. Avoid, however, caffeinated or alcoholic beverages.

Maintain good micturition health: emptying the bladder not only before sleeping but throughout the day, in addition to maintaining good habits at the time of going to the bathroom, will also help us at bedtime.

Rest is fundamental for the body and with small changes we can achieve great differences. Remember to consult with your doctor if you have any questions.

Sources:

https://www.neurologia.com/noticia/6059/el-sistema-inmunitario-se-reiniciaria-durante-el-sueno

La nocturia, principal causa de interrupción del sueño en varones adultos.

https://www.aao.org/salud-ocular/consejos/luz-natural-puede-beneficiar-las-personas-mayores

In general, when you have a shift job it is difficult to establish a healthy sleep routine. The rotating of shifts, the guards, the overtime, and the inability to sleep when you are supposed to do it, and having to do it with daylight or noise prevent our body from resting as it should. But in addition to all, if you are a nurse or caregiver, the task is much more complicated. It is just a challenge.

Health professionals struggle to maintain a healthy balance between work and their personal lives, and that includes having an adequate amount and quality of sleep and rest. Sleeping becomes a priority, especially when other people's lives are in their hands.

These are some of the tips you can follow if you find yourself in this situation:

1. Establish a frequent schedule: try to go to sleep and wake up always at the same time, although there may be days that you cannot accomplish the schedule due to shifts or guards.

2. Sleep strategic naps: naps less than 20 minutes are incredibly restorative and many of the hospitals allow their staff to benefit from them during long shifts.

3. Do not drink caffeine during the night: try to limit your intake to daytime hours to establish an adequate sleep pattern.

4. Take advantage of the sunny hours: although what you most want is to sleep after a night shift, the daylight makes your biological clock work correctly. Go out even if it's for a couple of hours.

5. Try to sleep in one breath: if you have no choice but to sleep during the day, try to do it right. Warn your family that you are going to rest so they do not bother you during certain hours, turn off your phone and concentrate on resting those hours.

With these tips you should establish a routine and have a much healthier rest. Take care of you to take care of others!

Sources:
http://www.nationalsleepfoundation.org./sleep-disorders-problems/shift-work-sleep-disorder-living-coping

https://www.americannursetoday.com/better-sleep-antidote-to-on-the-job-fatigue/

https://www.travelnursing.com/news/features-and-profiles/how-to-sleep-better-10-tips-for-nurses/

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